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Five Chemical Threats to the Great Lakes

Five Chemical Threats to the Great Lakes

The Great Lakes have faced various threats for years, from industrial pollution to invasive species, but another challenge worries many researchers these days - the emerging chemical threat.
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Manganese in Well Water Linked to Lower IQ Scores in Children

Children whose drinking water contains high concentrations of manganese appear to have lower IQ scores on average than children not exposed to the metallic element, researchers have found.
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Dr. Oz - Don't Drink the Water (Video)

Dr. Oz - Don't Drink the Water (Video)

It’s a question critical to your health and life itself: how safe is your drinking water? Dr. Oz goes one-on-one with the head of the EPA, Lisa Jackson, to discuss the four biggest threats to your drinking water. Find out how to keep your family safe.
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Lead in Your Drinking Water

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Arsenic In Your Tap Water

Arsenic is a naturally occurring substance found in rocks and soil. It comes in organic and inorganic forms. Organic arsenic is combined with carbon and is considered safe. Inorganic carbon is considered harmful to humans.
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Feds to Test Taps for Cancer Contaminants

OTTAWA - The federal government is ordering tests of Canada's drinking water over concerns it may contain contaminants thought to raise the risk of cancer and other health problems.
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Staying Healthy during Flu and Cold Season

Staying healthy is about our lifestyle choices. Here are a few ideas to help you get started on your way to wellness.
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Water Softeners Offer Green Benefits

Water softeners can save significant amounts of money and energy in the home, a major
new study by the independent Battelle Institute revealed.
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Toxic Waters

Toxic Waters

This article appeared in the New York Times September 13, 2009
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How to Reduce Water Pollution? Don't Wash Your Car At Home

Washing the family car in the driveway is a summertime ritual for many Canadian families. It's also an environmental hazard. The gunk from your car has to go somewhere when you wash it off, so where does it go?
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